Save the Coasts of the USA & the Coast Guard! By J.D. Meyer

Rising oceans threaten to submerge 128 military bases: report
1. <a href="https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2016/07/29/rising-oceans-threaten-to-submerge-128-military-bases-report/

Hurricane Isabel flooded classrooms and laboratories at the Naval Academy in 2013. A new report warns that Annapolis and 17 other military bases could contend with hundreds of floods a year by 2100. Photo Credit: Matt Houston/AP Sixteen of the installations studied would experience more than 100 floods every year and low-lying areas underwater for 10 to 25 percent of the year, the study found. Three installations would lose 10 percent of their land in the “intermediate” scenario and 25 percent in the “highest.”

The Navy installations on track for daily flooding are:
• Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Maine.
• The Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.
• Naval Support Facility Anacostia in Washington, DC.
• Washington Navy Yard in Washington, DC.
• Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia.
• Naval Air Station Oceana/Dam Neck Annex, Virginia.
• Naval Station Mayport, Florida.
• Naval Air Station Key West, Florida.
• Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Georgia.
The other branches’ bases at similar risks to daily flooding:
• Coast Guard Station Sandy Hook, New Jersey.
• Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, DC.
• Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.
• Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
• Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina.
• Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina.

Quick Links

To fund border wall, Trump administration weighs cuts to Coast Guard, airport security
2. <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/to-fund-border-wall-trump-administration-weighs-cuts-to-coast-guard-airport-security/2017/03/07/ba4a8e5c-036f-11e7-ad5b-d22680e18d10_story.html

U.S. Coast Guard Seized Record Amount of Drugs in 2016
3. <a href="http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/us-coast-guard-seized-record-amount-drugs-2016-19591

Cartels are using these ‘narco-submarines’ to move tens of thousands of pounds of drugs at a time
4. <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/cartel-narco-submarines-2016-9
“According to a US Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO) report on narco submarines citing Drug Enforcement Administration statistics, 80% of drugs smuggled into the US in 2012 came from maritime routes. And 30% of the drugs that arrived in the US by sea were conducted via narco submarines.”

5. National Climate Assessment
<a href="http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/report#intro-section

Go to http://www.bestplaces.net for Violent & Property Crime Rates—
based on FBI data:
USA avg. V—31.1, P—38.1.
TX avg. V—32.9, P—45.5
Tyler V—43.6, P—59.1

#SOL17: When Volunteering Includes Facebook , Cable TV, & Going to a Local Transit Meeting Downtown, by JD Meyer

This morning, I read about the horrible forest fires in British Columbia from a long-time cyberspace friend. Importantly, she noted her surprise that the fires followed a period of floods and how it was almost as surprising as tragic. Therefore, I looked for American universities with Forest Fire research institutes. Sure enough, Colorado State and the University of California have such organization, so I messaged her about them.
Typically, my TV is glued to CNN, MSNBC, or C-SPAN while I research the Internet via Twitter & Facebook primarily. A doctor told us about the sad story of a young comedian who died of alcohol withdrawals. My attention was grabbed when the doctor said that the comedian’s dopamine levels dropped dangerously low by “drying out.” That reminded me of how getting off cocaine and speed are strikingly similar. Tyrosine is an amino acid that replaces the neurotransmitter, dopamine, when one of those has been decreased by one of the big three drugs! So I called my darling G.P. M.D. with the news, and I told her secretary all about the amino acid to neurotransmitter connection.
Later, I went to a meeting about local city transit issues and how to increase ridership. I suggested to the VP of Tyler Transit that we emphasize taking the bus for shopping excursions. After all, if you have a low-paying job, you’ll settle for getting to work too early and leaving rather late because you don’t have a choice. Furthermore, a college student can always go to the library, cafeteria, or a prof’s office while (s)he waits on the bus.
But how do we get the middle-class/car owner to take the bus? Shopping trips? Maybe on a Saturday? How about “Beer and Bus” instead of “Drink and Drive”? I’ve organized bus trips with lunch for all of our five bus lines for the East Texas Human Needs Network (ETHNN) Transportation Committee. We went to both malls and two grocery stores—as well as Neighborhood Services next to a top store.
Anyway,today was a successful day for a disabled, retired teacher. Plus, I successfully walked home from downtown—roughly 1.5 miles with a stop at Family Dollar. Furthermore, I noticed that a street sign at the corner of S. Beckham & E. Front had been repaired after a storm, for I’d called City information about it a couple of days ago.

SOL17: World Asthma Day, Publicizing Dr. Tedros of Ethiopia for Director of WHO, etc.

I’m a retired teacher, disabled due to asthma and COPD. I developed asthma in 1987 and COPD in 2005. I got on SSDI in 2010. By 2012, I was on Medicare and Medicaid and had moved to the Hospital District, aka. Midtown, in Tyler, Texas–my third neighborhood in the largest city in East Texas.

Nowadays, I spend much of my time on Twitter and Facebook. I was happy to see that World Asthma Day fell on Slice of Life Tuesday today. One of the best articles that I read today was about the reasons for the rise in inhaler prices–a chilling indictment of “Big Pharma.” http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2011/07/cost-increase-asthma-inhalers-expensiveWhy You’re Paying More to Breathe

The happiest pack of articles that I’ve encountered lately is about Dr. Tedros of Ethiopia–the leading candidate for Director of the World Health Organization (WHO). http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/dr-tedros-is-the-leader-the-who-needs_us_59075cd2e4b03b105b44ba96?ncid=engmodushpmg00000004 Dr. Tedros is the Leader that WHO Needs

A sad article that I read was about Trump ending Michelle Obama’s program, “Let Girls Learn.” http://www.dailykos.com/story/2017/5/1/1657898/-Trump-administration-ends-Michelle-Obama-program-to-educate-girls-and-lift-them-out-of-povertyTrump administration ends Michelle Obama program to educate girls and lift them out of poverty Then I had a great idea. What if Dr. Tudros is able to revive Mrs. Obama’s program if he’s elected Director of WHO!

A different type of sad article shows that pollution causes lung disease. India is the most polluted country in the world with 13 of the 20 worst cities. Anti-asthma medicine has increased a staggering 43% in the past four years. Furthermore, it’s harder to measure the effects of air pollution in rural areas. Climate change is a big issue in political debate, despite its near unanimous recognition by science. However, how can pollution be denied at all? http://www.hindustantimes.com/health/world-asthma-day-india-chokes-sales-of-medicines-rise-43-in-4-years/story-mt5V9Kdqv4yGF062ZOmC6I.html World Asthma Day: India chokes, sales of medicines rise 43% in 4 years

To conclude, I started with the reasons for the rising cost of asthma inhalers, a graphic view of the actions of “Big Pharma.” Then I lamented the end of Michelle Obama’s project, “Let Girls Learn. ” Educated girls are more likely to be healthy and maybe wealthy. Then I campaigned for Dr. Turkos of Ethiopia for Director of the World Health Organization (WHO). Ethiopia has experienced dramatic health improvement through his guidance. I speculated that he may be able to save Mr. Obama’s project. Finally, I ended with the increase in asthma in India due to its air pollution. Nobody tries to deny that pollution can cause health problems. To conclude, improving health not only involves medical advances, but sound political decisions and cleaning up the planet!

Memories of My Three Walking Pneumonia Attacks, by J.D. Meyer

Watching Hillary Clinton cough during a speech and later stumble as she was leaving a 9-11 memorial service brought back memories of my three walking pneumonia attacks. I describe walking pneumonia as the “silent killer,” because you don’t know that you have it until it has gotten pretty bad and you end up in the E.R. of the hospital. Pneumonia is way different from noisy lung ailments such as asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, and COPD.

The first attack was in 1995 when I was an Adjunct Instructor of Developmental Writing at Mountain View Community College in northwest Oak Cliff. Some of my students noticed I’d been looking bad before I ended up getting my folks to take me to the E.R. of Baylor Hospital, which was near my centrally-located apartment in Old East Dallas.  I’d developed asthma eight years earlier, but only needed a rescue inhaler at the time. My other part-time job was as a construction assistant/groundskeeper for Medical Center of Mesquite. Plus, I played half-court basketball every weekend with my mentor prof friend, the late Lew Sayers, and his friends.  Immediately, I quit cigarettes for five years.

The second attack occurred in late 2005 when I was a full-time Instructor of Developmental English at Texas College, an HBCU in north Tyler. Strangely, I’d delivered a sermon entitled, “Best Practices and Biggest Challenges of Unitarian-Universalists,” and spoke way too fast that time. A few days later, I went to the doctor and discovered I not only had walking pneumonia but emphysema! By that time, I’d been using an albuterol nebulizer for eight years and Advair sporadically for a year or two.

The third attack was in 2011, and the worst of all of them as I was kept in the hospital for a few days after the all-too-frequent ER visit. By this time, I was on disability and waiting for Medicare to start. Fortunately, there was a computer for the patients to use. That’s where I met a middle school science teacher, who was there to visit an older relative. I ended up interviewing him about the Urban Gardens movement, and he knew plenty of websites. Later, I’d research the work of Detroit mayor and former NBA star, Dave Bing, for more information. There were some sites on urban vegetable farms from progressive Austin too. I ended up publishing an article on the topic, despite having an IV in my left arm while taking my first batch of notes! Now it’s on my website at https://www.academia.edu/1084754/Urban_Gardens

In conclusion, give Hillary Clinton a break. Walking pneumonia is sneaky, and it may not seem bad at first –even if you knew about it like her, unlike me. The important thing is making it to the doctor or hospital somewhat soon–instead of late. This article was delayed because of my hospitalization for COPD & hypertension, but no pneumonia!

On Promoting “4 Surgeries to Avoid,” According to AARP–Two Years Ago & Again Today

           I posted this op-ed two years ago at my website http://independent.academia.edu/JDMeyer and sent the op-ed hither and thither.  I’m trying again not only because my overall Twitter presence has improved, but since I’m a member of several health care social media (HCSM) member lists on Twitter, together with the mutual following of professionals in the health and medical field on Twitter.  This AARP article link still pops up in the margins of current articles, so it must be highly regarded.  Any contention for reducing the cost of an aspect of health care in the USA must be explored (Meyer, 2015).

http://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-05-2011/4-surgeries-to-avoid.1.html

“I’m promoting this AARP article about over-performed surgeries as something of a sequel to the Fareed Zakaria special on advice for President Obama’s second term. All of these surgeries are questionable in the long-term; some of these are “moneymakers for hospitals and doctors.” Thus, keeping control over Medicaid/Medicare expenses could start here. Here are the four debatable surgeries: (1) stents for stable angina, (2) complex spinal fusion for stenosis, (3) hysterectomy for uterine fibroids, and (4) knee arthroscopy for osteoarthritis.
Besides tweeting the article to my followers at @bohemiotx, I tweeted it to Fareed Zakaria & AARP with the hashtag #obamamemo. Afterwards, I posted it at the White House and Social Security websites. Then I posted “4 Surgeries to Avoid” at my Academia.edu, Facebook, Stumbleupon, and Linked-In sites. Then I emailed it to the county Democratic party and some members before tweeting the link to Reimagining Japan. My most recent cyberspace move is petitioning the President at his website; however, it failed to get hardly any endorsements.

Dr. Zakaria also stated, “U.S. spends $4 for every American over 65, compared with $1 for every American under 18 #obamamemo.” Dealing with an aging population that needs Medicare/Medicaid will be one of the biggest political issues that the U.S. (and Japan) will face in the near future. This could be the first step: eliminating unnecessary surgeries  (Meyer, 2013).”