Stop Asian Hate

To protest the Anti-Asian movement, I wore the following to Stanley’s Famous Bar-B-Q on Saturday afternoon: (1) my new red Sriracha hot sauce T-shirt, (2) a black bandanna with yin-yang symbols, and (3) my old maroon half-length kimono with the dragon on the back. …..I became a fan of Japanese culture in 3rd grade. I began studying Neo-Confucianism for my M.S. nearly 40 years ago. I taught South Vietnamese refugees ESOL in the late 90s–still have a full-sized flag. It looks like the Cefco logo!

Here’s my response to the CNN special: “Afraid: Fear in America’s Communities of Color.” Y’all hang in there. Multicultural White folks can relate to your grief. I’m happy to be a member of two private Confucian (Ru) groups (related thesis in 1984). My teaching audience was usually Black or Mexican-American. Tejano, soul, and melodic heavy metal rock! #StopAsianHate.

Martin Luther King Day 2021 in Tyler, Texas, by J.D. Meyer

This year’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day was held in the front yard of the new location for the Texas African-American Museum–coincidentally on MLK Blvd. in a former fire house. Martin Luther King BLVD is the major East-West Street in North Tyler, a predominantly Black neighborhood in Tyler, which includes Texas College–an HBCU and the first institute of higher education in this city.  The keynote speaker was Rev. Dr. Orenthia Mason.

The opening prayer was delivered by Bishop Laramie Jackson. It included a bridge to the past and a bridge to bring people together—struggles and achievements. Demerick Tezino sang “Amazing Grace.” LaToyia Jordan offered welcome before Gloria Washington announced the occasion. She reminisced about an early MLK Day observation in Jasper, Texas–25 years ago after an ice storm. “So we may be outdoors, socially distant during this coronavirus pandemic, but it was a rougher to hold a big event back then.” Plenty of chuckles responded.

Today included a celebration for having a new-and-improved location for the African-American Museum; it used to be further north in an abandoned elementary school, but now it’s on a major street. The late councilman, Ed Moore, was instrumental in getting the deal between the city and the museum, and a cornerstone has been planned in his honor. Shirley McKellar has become his successor as councilwoman. Some reconstruction is planned, and they will need donations.

Pastor Nicholas McGrew noted that he memorized the famous, “I Have a Dream” speech –so did his daughter! “We stand in the shadow of the Emancipation Proclamation, but 100 years later we still stand in an island of poverty in an ocean of the rich. To be satisfied, we need to have mobility, vote, and have justice. We still have the dream despite frustrations. Let us be judged by the content of our character; that’s one of MLK’s most famous sayings. Let freedom ring! We need to have integration of races and creeds. Then we’ll be free at last.”

Ms. Verlinda Stanton sang, “”Lift Every Voice and Sing,” the African-American National Anthem. She has worked with such stars as George Clinton and James Earl Jones. She has sung at an event for President Barack Obama too. 

Stanley Cofer introduced the keynote speaker, Dr. Orenthia Mason. He observed “the integrated crowd as a dream of Martin Luther King. Esteem others higher than yourself; it’s like giving flowers to those who are still alive. All men are created equal.” Rev. Mason taught in Tyler ISD for 27 years. She was also a principal and on several boards. She retired as minister of St. James Christian Methodist Episcopal (CME) church. By the way, Texas College is a CME institution of higher education.

Reverend Orenthia Mason gave a scholarly and “hard-hitting” speech. She noted our continued struggle for freedom and congratulated the museum and city. She asked, “What condition is our condition since MLK’s, ‘I Have a Dream’ speech?  We live through recurring cycle of racism, extremists, and hatred. Malcolm X told us to face reality, not a blurred version of the truth. Justice, whoever says it, benefits humanity.” To me, that sounds like a great critique of the ad hominem argument; ignore the idea because of disliking the speaker. Robert Kennedy asserted, “We should make an effort to understand others,” according to Rev. Mason.

She continued, “What condition is our condition in? When minorities vote more than average, it’s labeled as fraud. We are in perilous times.” Black kids are being threatened again. Reverend Mason recalled walking to school in groups with other Black kids, back in the 60s. That was because they could get attacked anyway—sometimes with baseball bats! She recalled, “You had to be better than best.  How about the average? The struggles and heart aches of the past are still being felt. We have a long way to go to reach the Promised Land. “

Reflecting on the present, Rev. Mason lamented, “Artifacts of the past include menacing white drivers ‘varooming’ their cars behind her on South Broadway! Many Tylerites don’t even know where Texas College is located.” {It’s located at 2404 N. Grand Avenue, north of MLK Blvd]. She felt more respected during segregation. “The ‘haves’ have more. We’re in the ‘midnight of life,’ ‘strangers in a strange land.’ Let’s sit down at the Welcome Table. Listen; look at character, intellect, and ability. All of us should be who we ought to be.”

Rev. Mason is proud to be a resident of north Tyler. She has been a member of Leadership Tyler, an integrated local think-tank. “We’ve never been more divided in the USA, but we’ll overcome some day. United we stand; divided we fall.”  She concluded with a quote by Henry David Thoreau, “It’s never too late to give up prejudice. Speak and listen.”

After another excellent song by Demetrick Tezino, Clarence Shackelford showed a model of the Martin Luther King, Jr. statue in Washington, DC. Leroy Francis donated the statue. Then Mr. Shackelford announced the Award Presentations. Mr. Shackelford, a noted photographer and Army veteran, is the founder of the Texas African-American Museum.  Dr. Donna Pitts, a dentist won an award. She’s a graduate of Prairie View A&M and Howard; both are HBCUs. Our new Vice-President, Kamala Harris, is a Howard grad too; it’s located in Washington, DC. Dr. Pitts works for Franklin Dentists in Tyler, and she’s a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority (pink and green colors). Vicki Betts, a librarian, won an award for historical research. (By the way, she’s a little White lady). Rodney L. Atkins also won an award for historical research by writing two books: Remembering When We Were Colored in Tyler, Texas and The History of African-American Teachers in Tyler ISD. He’s connected with the Victory Temple Church.Andre Crawford won the Golden Eagle Award for being the current director of the Tyler Barber College—the first Black institution of its kind in the USA! Tyler Barber College spread to other states. Barber shops have a long history of being community gathering places in Black neighborhoods.

Mayor Don Warren was invited to give some comments. Mayor Warren noted that when he saw an episode of Good Morning, America, kids quoted Martin Luther King, and then asked, “What’s wrong with America?” Mayor Warren, previously a long-time councilman, “wants to work with all of Tyler, so it will be unified and peaceful. “

The program concluded with miscellaneous remarks. A new Councilman for Section 1 said he used to be a fire chief in Tyler. Ed Thompson will do the construction work, and LLC will be the architect on the new museum. It is 5000 square feet—far bigger than the previous museum. The goal is $300K in renovations, but some of the money would go to outdoors construction–such as a playground and outdoor dining area. I suggested building an urban garden to Stanley Cofer, and I later sent my article on the topic. Lunch trucks would be invited as two were here for the festivities. Somebody was selling an African-American News Journal, based on newspaper articles for over a century. If the Texas African-American Museum gets 10K likes on Facebook, then they can have some advertisements there. TAAM is up to 5K likes at the time of the MLK Festival. Sadly, a minister noted that his kids were threatened in Whitehouse lately, a town just southeast of Tyler.

The 2021 Martin Luther King Day celebration was really different this year because of acquiring a better museum and having a North Tyler program. Due to the pandemic, there wasn’t the usual march down Broadway Avenue, followed by the program at Immaculate Conception Catholic Cathedral. Nevertheless, this year’s program was very uplifting and indicated real opportunities for Northside Revitalization that is now being pursued by the City of Tyler.  

Footnote: You can check out the edited version that was published in The Tyler Loop also. Thanks to Jane Neal. It’s posted at the top under the title.

Kwanzaa Reflections in 2020, by J.D. Meyer

We aren’t meeting in the Tyler, Texas Library in 2020 for Kwanzaa because of the coronavirus pandemic. I’ve been delivering official Kwanzaa speeches off-and-on since 2002—all but Faith Night out of seven nights. Of course, I check out Rev. Reginald Garrett for that last night.  I’ve published articles as well over the last couple of decades, and I’ve given some general Kwanzaa talks

But we need to do som’n in cyberspace for Kwanzaa. I want to go in the direction of health, specifically the OTC vitamins/minerals that I take on a daily basis. We need to boost our immune system, in case we catch the pandemic COVID19 virus!  OK, I’ve been on SSDI for a while for COPD, and I was invited to join the local Community Health Workers (CHW) coalition because of my Word Press articles and whatnot.

Here’s a great article about four great vitamins to boost your immune system: Vitamin D, Vitamin C, Zinc and something called Quercetin. https://www.fox29.com/news/studies-suggest-4-vitamins-to-prevent-severe-cases-of-covid-19?utm_campaign=trueanthem&utm_medium=trueanthem&utm_source=facebook&fbclid=IwAR2mhleKuo_ULIzTTnIKZoO7X3LsDdEK9T7K3F9ZgwNE0LFKRZIhv-5S-Jw It’s a well-known fact that Vitamin D is activated by sunlight darkening your skin. So darker people need more Vitamin D.

Not all multiple vitamins are alike. Spring Valley Super Vitamin B-Complex has 9 vitamins–including C & B12. Nature Made B-Complex has 6 vitamins–including C. Ocuvite for macular degeneration has zinc, among 6 vitamins and minerals plus lutein.

Irregular Verbs Spreadsheets

All 4 Principal Parts Different

 IRREGULAR VERBS  All 4 Principal Parts Different Part 1                              . 
 PresentPresent ParticiplePastPast Participle  
1.arisearisingarosearisen  
2.awake     
3.be     
4.bear     
5.begin     
6.bite     
7.blow     
8.break     
9.choose     
10.do     
11.draw     
12.drink     
13.drive     
14.dwell     
15.eat     
16.fall     
17.fly     
18.forbid     
19.forget     
20.forgive     
21.forsake     
22.freeze     
23.get     
24.give     
25.go     
26.grow     
27.hide     
28.know     
29.lie     
30.mow     
31.prove     
32.ride     
33.ring     
34.rise     
       
       
            IRREGULAR VERBS              All 4 principal parts different                          Part 2 
 PresentPresent ParticiplePastPast Participle 
35.saw (cut boards)    
36.see    
37.sew    
38.shake    
39.show    
40.shrink    
41.sink    
42.sing    
43.slay    
44.sow    
45.speak    
46.spring    
47.steal    
48.stink    
49.stride    
50.strive    
51.swear    
52.swell    
53.swim    
54.take    
55.tear    
56.throw    
57.tread    
58.wake    
59.wear    
60.weave    
61.write    
 IRREGULAR VERBSSame Past & Past Participle3 Forms—chart 3    
 PresentPresent ParticiplePast/Past Participle
62.bendbendingbent
63.bind  
64.bleed  
65.breed  
66.bring  
67.build  
68.burn*  
69.buy  
70.catch  
71.cling  
72.creep  
73.deal  
74.dig  
75.dive**  
76.dream*  
77.feed  
78.feel  
79.fight  
80.find  
81.flee  
82.fling  
83.fly  
84.grind  
85.hang*  
86.have  
87.hear  
88.hold  
89.keep  
90.kneel*  
91.lay  
92.lead  
93.leave  
94.lend  
95.light  
96.lose  
97.make  
98.mean  
99.meet  
100.pay  
101.say  
102.seek  
 IRREGULAR VERBSSame Past/Past Participle3 forms:  Part 2—chart 4        
 PresentPresent ParticiplePast/Past Participle
103.sell  
104.send  
105.shine  
106.shoot  
107.sit  
108sleep  
109.sling  
110.speed  
111.spend  
112.spill  
113.spin  
114.spit  
115.spoil*  
116.stand  
117.stick  
118.sting  
119.strike**  
120.string  
121.sweep  
122.swing  
123.teach  
124.tell  
125.think  
126.understand  
127.weep  
128.win  
129.wind  
130.wring  

Note:  * = There are two spellings for the past and past participle of these words.

   
 IRREGULAR VERBSOnly 2 Forms—chart 5
 Present/Past/Past ParticiplePresent Participle
131.betbetting
132.bid 
133.burst 
134.cast 
135.cost 
136.cut 
137.hit 
138.hurt 
139.fit 
140.let 
141.put 
142.quit 
143.read* 
144.rid 
145.set 
146.shed 
147.shut 
148.slit 
149.split 
150.spread 
151.thrust 
152.wet 

Note:  The word, “read,” appears to have only two forms visually, so it’s listed in this chart. Actually, “read,” has three different sounds in its principal parts because read has a long “e” in the present and a short “e” in the past

 Very Irregular Verbs!Same Present and Past Participle 3 Forms— chart 6
 PresentPresent ParticiplePastPast Participle
153.becomebecomingbecamebecome
154.come   
155.run   
 Extremely Irregular Verb!!Same Present and Past  
 PresentPresent ParticiplePastPast Participle
156.beat   

Meditation in Ruism (Confucianism) by J.D. Meyer

Meditation in Ruism is analyzed as a component of three major concepts. It’s (1) the attention aspect of Reverence, (2) the empathy aspect of Benevolence, and (3) the perspective aspect of Pattern-Principle.

Reverence= 敬  Jìng

Benevolence= 仁 Rén

Principle= 理  Lǐ

……………………………………..

Attention= 注意 Zhùyì

Empathy=  同情  Tóngqíng

Perspective= 透視 Tòushì

…………………………………………………………………

Slice of Life: A Word Game with the Writers Club of Tyler, TX by J.D. Meyer

The writer took the new Dash SALT-free Southwest Chipotle seasoning shaker and shook some in his beer. Not being AMBIDEXTROUS, I used my right HAND. The seasoning isn’t FIERY, just mildly spicy. ….I’ve let my gray hair grow over my EARS during the pandemic, or is it the pantheist epidemic? I have a relatively new black leather BELT with two metal hooks. …..My apartment complex is VOID of women wearing BIKINIS since the pool is closed. I’ve heard rumors that big snakes and alligators, if not CROCODILES, can be found in the woods around here…… My favorite all-cyberspace ALLIANCE is “Friends from afar: A Confucianism Group.” Ir’s great to read articles written or found from your Pan-Chinese Ru CONTEMPORARIES and know them. I posted what I did for the Birthday of Confucius yesterday. I’m glad we Writers Club folks still communicate, albeit ABSENTLY.

My Return to Slice of Life (SOL): The Welcome Dog Figurine–A Present from a Student, by J.D. Meyer

I am returning to Slice of Life (SOL) Tuesdays, for I ran across some old posts on my main Word Press site and became nostalgic–such fine feedback from other participants. I’m going to start with the tale of my dog figurine with a “Welcome” sign; the sign dangles from a chain in his mouth. A student gave me the coffee mug-sized doggie as a present, back when I was a full-time Developmental English instructor at Texas College (2001-06)–the HBCU (Historically Black Colleges & Universities) of Tyler, TX.

I tutored Spanish for free–not part of my job description–chiefly because our Spanish instructor–Mr. Idrogo–was an adjunct, who taught a couple of nights per week while he taught Spanish full-time for one of Tyler’s two public high schools. We met a few times, and I found him to be likeable, and he approved of my tutoring efforts. I was the main translator for our classroom building’s custodian also; she was basically “Spanish Only.” I also developed a website through McGraw-Hill Pageout with a major Spanish section, but that company ended this program many years ago.

That dog sculpture is white with black spots and is sitting on his /her back legs with the front legs straight. Recently that “Welcome Dog” has been sitting on round table between my futon sofa and the TV. Right now, that doggie is on my desk-top computer desk and may stay there–less crowded furniture. Viewing that dog brings back great memories. I won a few formal teaching awards that normally ended up being a certificate pinned to the wall. Strathmore’s Who’s Who was an entry in a giant book. But that dog figurine from my student is really special. Here’s my current Spanish tutorial website, and it includes links to my main website at Academia.edu. https://spanishtutorialdotnet.wordpress.com/

The Case Against Trump (and why some of your friends and family no longer want to speak to you)

Good Trouble

I love this country. I always have. But the last few years in the USA have left me truly aghast. Just when I think that there are no more surprises left in American political life, I am handed a freshly squeezed surprise. Bluntly put, I think we’ve reached the point where Donald Trump could drown a bag of kittens on live TV, or indeed “shoot someone on 5th Avenue”, and some people will still consider him the lesser of two evils.

The way I see it, there are two types of Trump voter. There is the hardcore MAGA fanatic, who attends the rallies, wears the red hat, and maybe even follows the Qanon boards. They follow Trump with a level of devotion that is implacable. They will never believe that Donald Trump is anything other than the savior of our country, sent by God to deliver us from a multitude…

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When Diversity Faces Reprisal: Threats to Sustainability in Composition, by J.D. Meyer

I’m a fan of the sustainability in composition model shared by Derek Owens of St. John’s University and Mary Newell of the U.S. Military Academy. Discovering their research vindicated what I had already been doing in my Developmental English/Writing courses and the textbook that I wrote for the class. There is no doubt that my students enjoyed writing about their lives, and I found them to be interesting; some writings became edited student essays in my textbook. Likewise, the vast majority of model essays reflected my experiences and studies.

Yet there is little doubt that many administrators and instructors would oppose much of my work, finding it too wide open. Here is my favorite way to summarize my detractors’ arguments, “Once I share the titles of these two edited students’ essays, I’ve made enemies: My Favorite Job: Driving a Tank in the Bosnian Conflict and My Favorite Music: Chopped, Screwed Dirty South Rap.” Critiques include “too regional and idiosyncratic,” too left-wing, too right-wing, too pro-military, too counterculture, too Texas, and not White enough. A recent article from Business Insider showed Texas to be the least popular state in the nation with other states, confirming a suspicion by a neighbor made several years earlier. Yet one should note that the prompts themselves weren’t controversial in themselves.

However, I’ve seen two horribly repressive persuasive essay prompts from the local community college: “(1) Why did you choose this college, and which is your favorite campus—no criticism is allowed. (2) Persuasive Essay: No controversial topics, such as abortion or marijuana legalization.” In the first instance, we see a case of pure propaganda. The depressed acquaintance had to be urged not to drop the course. In the second instance, we see a situation in which permission should have been sought before writing. Moreover, each instructor provided only that one narrow prompt.

The most gruesome model essay that I’ve ever seen in a textbook was about assisted suicide for the sickly, referring to the suicides of an elderly theologian couple. It has become a fixture in many Developmental English textbooks, and I challenged this essay in my essay, “Disputing Assisted Suicide of the Sickly.” https://bohemiotx.wordpress.com/2014/07/30/disputing-suicide-advocacy-for-the-sickly-a-model-essay-in-developmental-english-textbooks-by-jd-meyer

My main guidelines for essays were as follows: (1) The topic should be sufficiently broad or narrow to complete in the required length of the essay (typical). (2) No essays about committing crimes. (3) No reliving of sexual conquests or blunders. It hadn’t occurred to me that assisted suicide would be viewed as viable by the American textbook industry.

A common prompt is the “worst” something (as well as favorite), whether it’s a restaurant, job, boss, or whatever. I warned against writing about the reliving the worst of its category because one could get depressed, mad, and not finish their essay. On the other hand, it may be tough to decide which was the best or favorite restaurant, job,or boss, and you’d waste time trying to decide honestly which was #1 or #2. So settle for telling me about something in your top one-fourth.

Two of my oldest essays would escape criticism, especially from the elderly MeTV crowd: “A Favorite TV Series—Secret Agent” and “A Favorite Movie—The Fountainhead.” These would offer a touch of post World War II history as well. A couple of edited student essays would be accepted, such as “A Favorite CD—Natalie and Nat Cole” (through the miracle of modern recording technology) and “Comparing Two Jobs: Burger King and Target Warehouse.” Hey, that first essay was about contemporary music, and it’s safe.

I don’t mind teaching for the standardized test, and my persuasive chapter offers “A Study Guide for the THEA: Impressions and Objective Analysis.” That’s the all-important exit exam for all three Developmental courses. However, my human interest biography of Bruce Dickinson, best-known as the Iron Maiden singer, would probably face opposition for his genre and the critic wouldn’t bother to discover Bruce can fly jets, fence, drive tanks, host music programs, write fiction, and more. Orthodox forces have a narrower definition of what’s truly human.

Perhaps we could devise some cynical essay self-censoring model to save something besides the grammar chapter. The ad hominem logical fallacy is criticizing the product because of its creator, regardless if the product happens to be good this time. Dr. Maulana Karenga, the developer of Kwanzaa, faces such abuse because he was somewhat violent and Communist as a young man before settling down and becoming a star professor. Many want to over-generalize in their criticism or rightly fear reprisal from administrators and being ignored by textbook adopters. Maybe we should learn to anticipate and sadly acquiesce to it.

On the bright side, composition is one of the biggest college textbook markets; maybe it’s the ultimate regional market also. Keep some essays in Texas or leave them as prompts. Dr. Richard Florida, Business and Creativity professor at the University of Toronto, found that heavy metal is most popular in Scandinavia. So maybe I should look for an anthology over there. Dr. Florida became famous for his 4 T’s model of creativity leading to economic growth: talent, technology, tolerance, and territorial assets.

Somebody suggested that I go towards the ESOL market after seeing an account of my talk, “Knowing Spanish can Reduce Stress.” Earlier, somebody pointed to Diversity classes for counselors and social workers. Much of my African-American Studies chapter should be reserved for HBCU’s. The very social injustice and even ecological crises lamented by Derek Owens could easily be supported by a conservative establishment bent on socializing students for the workforce. Maybe enforcing nationwide, generic topics would be a strategy. As previously noted, the prompts are rarely problematic, but the individual response can show plenty of variety.

To conclude, collaboration among authors may be the safest route of all. There could be packets for various regions. Maybe a Texan could get wild and check out what’s going in another heavily populated state, such as New York or California. The Psalmist wrote, “Without counsel, plans go wrong , but with many advisers, they succeed.” Collaboration was the hallmark of Apple Computers in the Steve Jobs era too. Ekaterina Walter provides applicable insight from the business world. Knowing and understanding your customers have never been this important. Building long-term relationships so you can retain customers sounds much like college retention. Ms. Walter’s colleague, Nagy Thomas, CEO of Sprinklr, urges businesses to “hear the voice of the customer…Personalized experiences are helpful resources for those in need.” Let’s provide Developmental English and College Composition textbooks that inform, entertain, and persuade to borrow an expression from John Langan, the godfather of Developmental Reading and Writing textbooks.

About Dexamethasone, a steroid, for the Treatment of COVID-19

https://www.covid19treatmentguidelines.nih.gov/…/corticost…/

KEY QUOTE from ARTICLE…….. “Panel recommends against using dexamethasone for the treatment of COVID-19 in patients who don’t require supplemental oxygen (AI). If dexamethasone isn’t available, the Panel recommends using alternative glucocorticoids such as prednisone, methylprednisolone, or hydrocortisone.”…….

EXPERIMENT “I have #COPD & #asthma. I take #prednisone & Advair among many other medicines. Do you think those two drugs would help me from having a severe attack of #coronavirus if I caught it? I use #oxygen after a long walk.”

P.S. This suggestion has some implications. Could I miss the endangered list for bad lung patients? I’m not automatically suggesting that dexamethasone/prednisone plus oxygen necessarily be the treatment in a hospital. Furthermore, other daily medications could boost the immune system and be a confounding variable, and they may work on heart/blood pressure and or fat/obesity problems. Magnesium and CoQ10 are are great!

By the way, I tested negative at the Tyler Care Clinic Quick COVID-19 test on Friday, August 28. Previously, I tested negative at St. Louis Baptist Church on Wednesday, June 17.

Review results from studies evaluating corticosteroids for the treatment of COVID-19.

 

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