Stop Asian Hate

To protest the Anti-Asian movement, I wore the following to Stanley’s Famous Bar-B-Q on Saturday afternoon: (1) my new red Sriracha hot sauce T-shirt, (2) a black bandanna with yin-yang symbols, and (3) my old maroon half-length kimono with the dragon on the back. …..I became a fan of Japanese culture in 3rd grade. I began studying Neo-Confucianism for my M.S. nearly 40 years ago. I taught South Vietnamese refugees ESOL in the late 90s–still have a full-sized flag. It looks like the Cefco logo!

Here’s my response to the CNN special: “Afraid: Fear in America’s Communities of Color.” Y’all hang in there. Multicultural White folks can relate to your grief. I’m happy to be a member of two private Confucian (Ru) groups (related thesis in 1984). My teaching audience was usually Black or Mexican-American. Tejano, soul, and melodic heavy metal rock! #StopAsianHate.

Irregular Verbs Spreadsheets

All 4 Principal Parts Different

 IRREGULAR VERBS  All 4 Principal Parts Different Part 1                              . 
 PresentPresent ParticiplePastPast Participle  
1.arisearisingarosearisen  
2.awake     
3.be     
4.bear     
5.begin     
6.bite     
7.blow     
8.break     
9.choose     
10.do     
11.draw     
12.drink     
13.drive     
14.dwell     
15.eat     
16.fall     
17.fly     
18.forbid     
19.forget     
20.forgive     
21.forsake     
22.freeze     
23.get     
24.give     
25.go     
26.grow     
27.hide     
28.know     
29.lie     
30.mow     
31.prove     
32.ride     
33.ring     
34.rise     
       
       
            IRREGULAR VERBS              All 4 principal parts different                          Part 2 
 PresentPresent ParticiplePastPast Participle 
35.saw (cut boards)    
36.see    
37.sew    
38.shake    
39.show    
40.shrink    
41.sink    
42.sing    
43.slay    
44.sow    
45.speak    
46.spring    
47.steal    
48.stink    
49.stride    
50.strive    
51.swear    
52.swell    
53.swim    
54.take    
55.tear    
56.throw    
57.tread    
58.wake    
59.wear    
60.weave    
61.write    
 IRREGULAR VERBSSame Past & Past Participle3 Forms—chart 3    
 PresentPresent ParticiplePast/Past Participle
62.bendbendingbent
63.bind  
64.bleed  
65.breed  
66.bring  
67.build  
68.burn*  
69.buy  
70.catch  
71.cling  
72.creep  
73.deal  
74.dig  
75.dive**  
76.dream*  
77.feed  
78.feel  
79.fight  
80.find  
81.flee  
82.fling  
83.fly  
84.grind  
85.hang*  
86.have  
87.hear  
88.hold  
89.keep  
90.kneel*  
91.lay  
92.lead  
93.leave  
94.lend  
95.light  
96.lose  
97.make  
98.mean  
99.meet  
100.pay  
101.say  
102.seek  
 IRREGULAR VERBSSame Past/Past Participle3 forms:  Part 2—chart 4        
 PresentPresent ParticiplePast/Past Participle
103.sell  
104.send  
105.shine  
106.shoot  
107.sit  
108sleep  
109.sling  
110.speed  
111.spend  
112.spill  
113.spin  
114.spit  
115.spoil*  
116.stand  
117.stick  
118.sting  
119.strike**  
120.string  
121.sweep  
122.swing  
123.teach  
124.tell  
125.think  
126.understand  
127.weep  
128.win  
129.wind  
130.wring  

Note:  * = There are two spellings for the past and past participle of these words.

   
 IRREGULAR VERBSOnly 2 Forms—chart 5
 Present/Past/Past ParticiplePresent Participle
131.betbetting
132.bid 
133.burst 
134.cast 
135.cost 
136.cut 
137.hit 
138.hurt 
139.fit 
140.let 
141.put 
142.quit 
143.read* 
144.rid 
145.set 
146.shed 
147.shut 
148.slit 
149.split 
150.spread 
151.thrust 
152.wet 

Note:  The word, “read,” appears to have only two forms visually, so it’s listed in this chart. Actually, “read,” has three different sounds in its principal parts because read has a long “e” in the present and a short “e” in the past

 Very Irregular Verbs!Same Present and Past Participle 3 Forms— chart 6
 PresentPresent ParticiplePastPast Participle
153.becomebecomingbecamebecome
154.come   
155.run   
 Extremely Irregular Verb!!Same Present and Past  
 PresentPresent ParticiplePastPast Participle
156.beat   

My Return to Slice of Life (SOL): The Welcome Dog Figurine–A Present from a Student, by J.D. Meyer

I am returning to Slice of Life (SOL) Tuesdays, for I ran across some old posts on my main Word Press site and became nostalgic–such fine feedback from other participants. I’m going to start with the tale of my dog figurine with a “Welcome” sign; the sign dangles from a chain in his mouth. A student gave me the coffee mug-sized doggie as a present, back when I was a full-time Developmental English instructor at Texas College (2001-06)–the HBCU (Historically Black Colleges & Universities) of Tyler, TX.

I tutored Spanish for free–not part of my job description–chiefly because our Spanish instructor–Mr. Idrogo–was an adjunct, who taught a couple of nights per week while he taught Spanish full-time for one of Tyler’s two public high schools. We met a few times, and I found him to be likeable, and he approved of my tutoring efforts. I was the main translator for our classroom building’s custodian also; she was basically “Spanish Only.” I also developed a website through McGraw-Hill Pageout with a major Spanish section, but that company ended this program many years ago.

That dog sculpture is white with black spots and is sitting on his /her back legs with the front legs straight. Recently that “Welcome Dog” has been sitting on round table between my futon sofa and the TV. Right now, that doggie is on my desk-top computer desk and may stay there–less crowded furniture. Viewing that dog brings back great memories. I won a few formal teaching awards that normally ended up being a certificate pinned to the wall. Strathmore’s Who’s Who was an entry in a giant book. But that dog figurine from my student is really special. Here’s my current Spanish tutorial website, and it includes links to my main website at Academia.edu. https://spanishtutorialdotnet.wordpress.com/

When Diversity Faces Reprisal: Threats to Sustainability in Composition, by J.D. Meyer

I’m a fan of the sustainability in composition model shared by Derek Owens of St. John’s University and Mary Newell of the U.S. Military Academy. Discovering their research vindicated what I had already been doing in my Developmental English/Writing courses and the textbook that I wrote for the class. There is no doubt that my students enjoyed writing about their lives, and I found them to be interesting; some writings became edited student essays in my textbook. Likewise, the vast majority of model essays reflected my experiences and studies.

Yet there is little doubt that many administrators and instructors would oppose much of my work, finding it too wide open. Here is my favorite way to summarize my detractors’ arguments, “Once I share the titles of these two edited students’ essays, I’ve made enemies: My Favorite Job: Driving a Tank in the Bosnian Conflict and My Favorite Music: Chopped, Screwed Dirty South Rap.” Critiques include “too regional and idiosyncratic,” too left-wing, too right-wing, too pro-military, too counterculture, too Texas, and not White enough. A recent article from Business Insider showed Texas to be the least popular state in the nation with other states, confirming a suspicion by a neighbor made several years earlier. Yet one should note that the prompts themselves weren’t controversial in themselves.

However, I’ve seen two horribly repressive persuasive essay prompts from the local community college: “(1) Why did you choose this college, and which is your favorite campus—no criticism is allowed. (2) Persuasive Essay: No controversial topics, such as abortion or marijuana legalization.” In the first instance, we see a case of pure propaganda. The depressed acquaintance had to be urged not to drop the course. In the second instance, we see a situation in which permission should have been sought before writing. Moreover, each instructor provided only that one narrow prompt.

The most gruesome model essay that I’ve ever seen in a textbook was about assisted suicide for the sickly, referring to the suicides of an elderly theologian couple. It has become a fixture in many Developmental English textbooks, and I challenged this essay in my essay, “Disputing Assisted Suicide of the Sickly.” https://bohemiotx.wordpress.com/2014/07/30/disputing-suicide-advocacy-for-the-sickly-a-model-essay-in-developmental-english-textbooks-by-jd-meyer

My main guidelines for essays were as follows: (1) The topic should be sufficiently broad or narrow to complete in the required length of the essay (typical). (2) No essays about committing crimes. (3) No reliving of sexual conquests or blunders. It hadn’t occurred to me that assisted suicide would be viewed as viable by the American textbook industry.

A common prompt is the “worst” something (as well as favorite), whether it’s a restaurant, job, boss, or whatever. I warned against writing about the reliving the worst of its category because one could get depressed, mad, and not finish their essay. On the other hand, it may be tough to decide which was the best or favorite restaurant, job,or boss, and you’d waste time trying to decide honestly which was #1 or #2. So settle for telling me about something in your top one-fourth.

Two of my oldest essays would escape criticism, especially from the elderly MeTV crowd: “A Favorite TV Series—Secret Agent” and “A Favorite Movie—The Fountainhead.” These would offer a touch of post World War II history as well. A couple of edited student essays would be accepted, such as “A Favorite CD—Natalie and Nat Cole” (through the miracle of modern recording technology) and “Comparing Two Jobs: Burger King and Target Warehouse.” Hey, that first essay was about contemporary music, and it’s safe.

I don’t mind teaching for the standardized test, and my persuasive chapter offers “A Study Guide for the THEA: Impressions and Objective Analysis.” That’s the all-important exit exam for all three Developmental courses. However, my human interest biography of Bruce Dickinson, best-known as the Iron Maiden singer, would probably face opposition for his genre and the critic wouldn’t bother to discover Bruce can fly jets, fence, drive tanks, host music programs, write fiction, and more. Orthodox forces have a narrower definition of what’s truly human.

Perhaps we could devise some cynical essay self-censoring model to save something besides the grammar chapter. The ad hominem logical fallacy is criticizing the product because of its creator, regardless if the product happens to be good this time. Dr. Maulana Karenga, the developer of Kwanzaa, faces such abuse because he was somewhat violent and Communist as a young man before settling down and becoming a star professor. Many want to over-generalize in their criticism or rightly fear reprisal from administrators and being ignored by textbook adopters. Maybe we should learn to anticipate and sadly acquiesce to it.

On the bright side, composition is one of the biggest college textbook markets; maybe it’s the ultimate regional market also. Keep some essays in Texas or leave them as prompts. Dr. Richard Florida, Business and Creativity professor at the University of Toronto, found that heavy metal is most popular in Scandinavia. So maybe I should look for an anthology over there. Dr. Florida became famous for his 4 T’s model of creativity leading to economic growth: talent, technology, tolerance, and territorial assets.

Somebody suggested that I go towards the ESOL market after seeing an account of my talk, “Knowing Spanish can Reduce Stress.” Earlier, somebody pointed to Diversity classes for counselors and social workers. Much of my African-American Studies chapter should be reserved for HBCU’s. The very social injustice and even ecological crises lamented by Derek Owens could easily be supported by a conservative establishment bent on socializing students for the workforce. Maybe enforcing nationwide, generic topics would be a strategy. As previously noted, the prompts are rarely problematic, but the individual response can show plenty of variety.

To conclude, collaboration among authors may be the safest route of all. There could be packets for various regions. Maybe a Texan could get wild and check out what’s going in another heavily populated state, such as New York or California. The Psalmist wrote, “Without counsel, plans go wrong , but with many advisers, they succeed.” Collaboration was the hallmark of Apple Computers in the Steve Jobs era too. Ekaterina Walter provides applicable insight from the business world. Knowing and understanding your customers have never been this important. Building long-term relationships so you can retain customers sounds much like college retention. Ms. Walter’s colleague, Nagy Thomas, CEO of Sprinklr, urges businesses to “hear the voice of the customer…Personalized experiences are helpful resources for those in need.” Let’s provide Developmental English and College Composition textbooks that inform, entertain, and persuade to borrow an expression from John Langan, the godfather of Developmental Reading and Writing textbooks.

My Juneteenth/Dreamer story.

My Juneteenth/Dreamer story. My grandpa, Joe Leo Meyer (1874-1944), was a refugee from Alsace, France. He fled to Victoria, TX when he was only 16, and moved in with his uncle. Joe learned English when he got here; he spoke Alsatian, a language more like German than French. Eventually, Grandpa started the Dr. Pepper plant of Palestine, TX. Juneteenth was his biggest business day of the year. He helped his star employee (a Black guy) learn German. Grandpa used to tell my Dad, “C’mon Bobo, I gotta take Nolan to Willie-the-Butcher, so he can practice his German.”
I heard Nolan ended up getting a doctorate. Later in life, I did the research. Dr. Nolan Hamilton Anderson, MD got his degrees from Wiley College, University of Michigan, and Meharry University. Dr. Anderson returned home to Wiley, the HBCU of Marshall, TX, and taught there; he practiced medicine too He was honored by the NAACP and delivered future boxer, George Foreman. Nolan was one of the Great Debaters as a Wiley College student too! Wiley College defeated USC (University of Southern California) in 1935. http://artofthepossibleonline.blogspot.com/2008/08/capturing-real-great-debaters.html

Sequel to “The Trooper,” by Iron Maiden By J.D. Meyer

As she tromped through the field, a battlefield, where the lifeless and wounded warriors lay, the now-famous nurse—Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) —tried to help the living while other personnel carried away the dead. The time is the 1850’s; the war is the Russian-British Crimean War (1853-1856); the battle is the Battle of Balaclava in 1854. Alas, The Trooper himself was one of the slain. Ms. Nightingale burst into tears when she saw this soldier dead on the ground, for she heard of his legendary bravery from previous battles.
The Russian musket fire killed our Trooper and even his beloved horse. A couple of bugles lay on the ground amidst the fallen soldiers—no longer to summon the troops to battle. Florence Nightingale and the other nurses had to hurdle the lifeless bodies to reach the wounded—although often mortally wounded. Nurse Nightingale told another nurse, “Such carnage! I’m ready for peace, so we can return to dealing with colds and sprained ankles.” The other nurse agreed, ”Our calling is tough. But it’s really becoming modern science.”
The last round of fire in The Battle of Balaclava got The Trooper; he feared the end was near during this bloody battle. At first, it looked like either side could have claimed a pyrrhic victory. But the British blundered with a final cavalry charge, immortalized in Tennyson’s, “Charge of the Light Brigade,” that wiped out many British cavalry. Ottoman Turk losses were heavy too.
A few Turkish allies lay near The Trooper—some clinging to life. One Turk told Nurse Nightingale about The Trooper’s bravery. “The Trooper seemed like a man possessed. He kept charging toward the Russian lines, dodging many a bullet until the last one felled his horse, then him. We didn’t think he’d last as long as he did.” Nurse Nightingale wept.
No country had more to lose in the Crimean War than the Ottoman Empire—now known as modern Turkey, a smaller but stronger country. Long known as “The Sick Man of Europe,” the Ottoman Empire’s decline was well under way. World War I, some 60 years late, finished the Ottoman Empire’s demise—only to be reborn as the first secular Moslem country in history—Turkey—through the leadership of Attaturk in the 1920’s. Unfortunately, Turkey has experienced “democratic backsliding” under President Tayyip Erdogan in recent years.

Now we have Indonesia as the second predominantly Moslem secular country. It has a constitution that protects non-Moslems, and it’s even had the Confucian Church of Indonesia since the late 19th century through the efforts of Chinese immigrants. Indonesia is also the home of the Jaringan Islam Liberal, directed by Ulil Abshar-Abdallah.
Thanks to the noble Turk soldier and the Battle of Balaclava and Nurse Florence Nightingale, The Trooper is not forgotten and never was alone. Nurse Nightingale even sent a message by telegraph about the tale of The Trooper to her hospital administrator back home in England—just in case she didn’t make it back, but she did.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMyMS-p9YW0 “The Trooper,” by Iron Maiden (with lyrics).

How To Make Sense of the Pandemic as a Ruist (Confucianist) ?

Confucius Academy

Hallo, my name is Bin Song. I am a Ru scholar, therapist, and college professor in the disciplines of philosophy, religion, and theology. This audio is written and recorded by me to help make sense of the cause of this pandemic in light of the spiritual practice of Ru meditation.

Before you start to listen to my words, I recommend you to do a short breathing practice to calm our heart and illuminate our mind. So, please position yourself well, sit, incline, or simply lie down. Using your belly muscles, be aware of the minor movements of your body, and then, focus upon your breath. Breathe in, deeply, slowly, and comfortably. Breathe out, feel the release, and feel the relax. And a short pause. Again, breathe in, breathe out. remember, no matter how bad the pandemic is, how frustrated you feel about your situation, there is always air and oxygen…

View original post 1,685 more words

My Illnesses & Pills: Strengthening the Immune System–One Way to Battle the COVID-19/Coronavirus Pandemic, by J. D. Meyer (2nd Edition)

Dang, I’ve been feeling good for four years! But I fit the stereotype of someone that ought to be “fixin’ to get sick”—lungs illness, namely COPD (since 2005) and asthma (since 1986). I got on the combination of SSDI, Medicare, and Medicaid by 2012. I’m writing this article about my illnesses and pills because medical professionals may find clues to finding a way to battle the COVID-19/coronavirus pandemic. Dealing with the pandemic takes three routes in the medical community: building the immune system, finding antibodies, and discovering a vaccination. My article represents the way for educated laymen to contribute.

I take at least 15 pills per day (11 different pills)—a motley mix of prescription drugs, vitamins/minerals, and OTC drugs. I have more health issues than Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome (ACOS). Quitting cigarettes was important as was quitting snuff tobacco. Nowadays, I occasionally indulge with Smoky Mountain Herbal Snuff (Wintergreen Flavor). It’s made from corn husks and molasses; it’s made in Sandy Hook, CT.

Here are the rest of my diagnoses: Mixed hyperlipidemia E 78.2, Essential (primary) hypertension I10, atherosclerosis heart disease of native coronary artery without angina pectoris I25.10, and macular degeneration. Furthermore, I get monthly allergy shots for Bermuda and Johnson grass, and I have sleep apnea.

Now let’s check out my daily pills. Prescriptions: Daliresp, Montelukast, Dilacor (DILT), Omega 3 Acid Ethyl Esters (4, Take two twice daily), and Prednisone. Vitamins/Minerals: Magnesium, CoQ10, Vitamin D (2), Ocuvite (Vision Health). That last pill is a mix of Vitamins A, C, E and Zinc, Selenium, Copper, and Lutein. Over the Counter Medicine (OTC): Vitamin B-Complex with C (general health)& Loratadine (non-drowsy generic pill for allergies).

Here are the drugs that I inhale. Obviously, I have a rescue inhaler, and it’s Combivent (albuterol + ipratropium). I graduated from the albuterol inhalers a while back. But my nebulizer fluid is albuterol only. Then I take Advair twice daily, an anti-inflammatory.

Here are the occasional OTC drugs and vitamins/minerals: Sudafed (nasal congestion), Mucinex–aka. Guaifenesin (chest congestion/bronchitis). , Milk Thistle (liver health) and rarest of all—Turmeric Curcumin (anti-inflammation). Before I got health insurance, Mucinex and Sudafed were very frequent companions. I’ve become a member of the Chris Cuomo Fan Club and explained the joy of Mucinex on his website.

Let’s hope that my list of medicines and illnesses helps medical researchers during our pandemic crisis. I was invited to join the local Community Health Workers (CHW) coalition several years ago because of my explanation of lung health issues for the layman. I used to be a teacher–mostly Developmental English/Writing (college level), ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages)for all levels, and all-level/ most subjects substitute teacher.

Some of those drugs and whatnot represent a journey! Magnesium is a new friend. First I was put on statins and developed heart issues. Then I found CoQ10 and that helped. Then I had a phase of Red Yeast Rice–a more organic, mellow statin. Then I read a couple of journal articles against it and stumbled onto Magnesium. Magnesium is the super mineral. It’s good for excess fat, arthritis, COPD, and even more issues!

My most recent drug is prednisone—previously som’n just for acute attacks. I passed a recent chest X-ray, but my pulmonologist felt that I needed prednisone. After all, I’ve had a low moderate Forced Exhale Volume (FEV) for years. I may be 6’2” and 61 years old, but my FEV is comparable to a short elderly lady’s lungs, or just one lung, or a very short child’s lungs. Stop smoking, stay indoors, or wear a mask/bandanna when shopping.

What Do You Tell People Who Are Scared About the Coronavirus/COVID19 Outbreak? By J.D. Meyer

I will be encouraging. We have many medical professionals working on the Coronavirus/COVID19 crisis throughout the nation and world. The two most visible national officials rising to the occasion are Governor Andrew Cuomo (D-NY), and immunologist, Dr. Anthony Fauci (Director of the National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases). In his inspiring Saturday morning address, Gov. Cuomo asserted, “We are all first responders.” We could help or inspire somebody, but we could also get somebody sick or depressed.

For me, sharing health information on Twitter, Facebook, and Word Press would be my main way to inform and inspire. I taught for 20 years—mostly Developmental English/Writing (a college course), English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) to all ages, and an “All Grades/Most Subjects” substitute teacher. I just hit the 39K tweet mark—starting in October 2011.

Several years ago, I was invited to join the local Community Health Workers (CHW) group—the Northeast Texas CHW Coalition, for I’d written some articles about my health issues for the layman. I’ve been on SSDI for COPD for a decade! I have a special interest in magnesium since it has really helped improve my health for the past two years—cholesterol, arthritis, and COPD. CoQ10 was another relatively recent find for me, and it helps heart health.

Furthermore, I can share academic or entertaining information on a broader scale. After all, plenty of students are going to be studying online. Maybe I could publicize my love of Tejano music improving my Spanish to friends’ kids? The other day, I brought a spare Brookshire’s cooking magazine and a brief bio-sketch on Sriracha Hot Sauce by Huy Fong foods to a young mom and her depressed 2nd-grade daughter, who was stuck with her in the kitchen of a nearby service station.

I’m continuing to offer relevant follow-up articles of mine to the Tyler First 2020 Open House leaders. It was a great event just before the Coronavirus shutdown at the Rose Garden city’s convention building with plenty of posters, handouts, and websites. Urban studies have been a hobby of mine for many years—even longer than health.

As for being entertaining, I asked Facebook associates if they would like to share information on interior decorating accomplishments during the shutdown. Besides lots of counter and table dusting and paper sorting and trashing, I rearranged some decorative bar stools. I did receive several responses–including some photos from someone who rearranged some heavy tools in his garage!

Wish us luck in being informative, entertaining, and persuasive.  There’s a new Facebook group called, “Support Our Local Tyler Businesses During COVID-19.” Hopefully, politics will take more of a back seat with me in the near future.