Save the Coasts of the USA & the Coast Guard! By J.D. Meyer

Rising oceans threaten to submerge 128 military bases: report
1. <a href="https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2016/07/29/rising-oceans-threaten-to-submerge-128-military-bases-report/

Hurricane Isabel flooded classrooms and laboratories at the Naval Academy in 2013. A new report warns that Annapolis and 17 other military bases could contend with hundreds of floods a year by 2100. Photo Credit: Matt Houston/AP Sixteen of the installations studied would experience more than 100 floods every year and low-lying areas underwater for 10 to 25 percent of the year, the study found. Three installations would lose 10 percent of their land in the “intermediate” scenario and 25 percent in the “highest.”

The Navy installations on track for daily flooding are:
• Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Maine.
• The Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.
• Naval Support Facility Anacostia in Washington, DC.
• Washington Navy Yard in Washington, DC.
• Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia.
• Naval Air Station Oceana/Dam Neck Annex, Virginia.
• Naval Station Mayport, Florida.
• Naval Air Station Key West, Florida.
• Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Georgia.
The other branches’ bases at similar risks to daily flooding:
• Coast Guard Station Sandy Hook, New Jersey.
• Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, DC.
• Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.
• Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
• Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina.
• Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina.

Quick Links

To fund border wall, Trump administration weighs cuts to Coast Guard, airport security
2. <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/to-fund-border-wall-trump-administration-weighs-cuts-to-coast-guard-airport-security/2017/03/07/ba4a8e5c-036f-11e7-ad5b-d22680e18d10_story.html

U.S. Coast Guard Seized Record Amount of Drugs in 2016
3. <a href="http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/us-coast-guard-seized-record-amount-drugs-2016-19591

Cartels are using these ‘narco-submarines’ to move tens of thousands of pounds of drugs at a time
4. <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/cartel-narco-submarines-2016-9
“According to a US Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO) report on narco submarines citing Drug Enforcement Administration statistics, 80% of drugs smuggled into the US in 2012 came from maritime routes. And 30% of the drugs that arrived in the US by sea were conducted via narco submarines.”

5. National Climate Assessment
<a href="http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/report#intro-section

Go to http://www.bestplaces.net for Violent & Property Crime Rates—
based on FBI data:
USA avg. V—31.1, P—38.1.
TX avg. V—32.9, P—45.5
Tyler V—43.6, P—59.1

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#SOL17: When Volunteering Includes Facebook , Cable TV, & Going to a Local Transit Meeting Downtown, by JD Meyer

This morning, I read about the horrible forest fires in British Columbia from a long-time cyberspace friend. Importantly, she noted her surprise that the fires followed a period of floods and how it was almost as surprising as tragic. Therefore, I looked for American universities with Forest Fire research institutes. Sure enough, Colorado State and the University of California have such organization, so I messaged her about them.
Typically, my TV is glued to CNN, MSNBC, or C-SPAN while I research the Internet via Twitter & Facebook primarily. A doctor told us about the sad story of a young comedian who died of alcohol withdrawals. My attention was grabbed when the doctor said that the comedian’s dopamine levels dropped dangerously low by “drying out.” That reminded me of how getting off cocaine and speed are strikingly similar. Tyrosine is an amino acid that replaces the neurotransmitter, dopamine, when one of those has been decreased by one of the big three drugs! So I called my darling G.P. M.D. with the news, and I told her secretary all about the amino acid to neurotransmitter connection.
Later, I went to a meeting about local city transit issues and how to increase ridership. I suggested to the VP of Tyler Transit that we emphasize taking the bus for shopping excursions. After all, if you have a low-paying job, you’ll settle for getting to work too early and leaving rather late because you don’t have a choice. Furthermore, a college student can always go to the library, cafeteria, or a prof’s office while (s)he waits on the bus.
But how do we get the middle-class/car owner to take the bus? Shopping trips? Maybe on a Saturday? How about “Beer and Bus” instead of “Drink and Drive”? I’ve organized bus trips with lunch for all of our five bus lines for the East Texas Human Needs Network (ETHNN) Transportation Committee. We went to both malls and two grocery stores—as well as Neighborhood Services next to a top store.
Anyway,today was a successful day for a disabled, retired teacher. Plus, I successfully walked home from downtown—roughly 1.5 miles with a stop at Family Dollar. Furthermore, I noticed that a street sign at the corner of S. Beckham & E. Front had been repaired after a storm, for I’d called City information about it a couple of days ago.