What Do You Tell People Who Are Scared About the Coronavirus/COVID19 Outbreak? By J.D. Meyer

I will be encouraging. We have many medical professionals working on the Coronavirus/COVID19 crisis throughout the nation and world. The two most visible national officials rising to the occasion are Governor Andrew Cuomo (D-NY), and immunologist, Dr. Anthony Fauci (Director of the National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases). In his inspiring Saturday morning address, Gov. Cuomo asserted, “We are all first responders.” We could help or inspire somebody, but we could also get somebody sick or depressed.

For me, sharing health information on Twitter, Facebook, and Word Press would be my main way to inform and inspire. I taught for 20 years—mostly Developmental English/Writing (a college course), English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) to all ages, and an “All Grades/Most Subjects” substitute teacher. I just hit the 39K tweet mark—starting in October 2011.

Several years ago, I was invited to join the local Community Health Workers (CHW) group—the Northeast Texas CHW Coalition, for I’d written some articles about my health issues for the layman. I’ve been on SSDI for COPD for a decade! I have a special interest in magnesium since it has really helped improve my health for the past two years—cholesterol, arthritis, and COPD. CoQ10 was another relatively recent find for me, and it helps heart health.

Furthermore, I can share academic or entertaining information on a broader scale. After all, plenty of students are going to be studying online. Maybe I could publicize my love of Tejano music improving my Spanish to friends’ kids? The other day, I brought a spare Brookshire’s cooking magazine and a brief bio-sketch on Sriracha Hot Sauce by Huy Fong foods to a young mom and her depressed 2nd-grade daughter, who was stuck with her in the kitchen of a nearby service station.

I’m continuing to offer relevant follow-up articles of mine to the Tyler First 2020 Open House leaders. It was a great event just before the Coronavirus shutdown at the Rose Garden city’s convention building with plenty of posters, handouts, and websites. Urban studies have been a hobby of mine for many years—even longer than health.

As for being entertaining, I asked Facebook associates if they would like to share information on interior decorating accomplishments during the shutdown. Besides lots of counter and table dusting and paper sorting and trashing, I rearranged some decorative bar stools. I did receive several responses–including some photos from someone who rearranged some heavy tools in his garage!

Wish us luck in being informative, entertaining, and persuasive.  There’s a new Facebook group called, “Support Our Local Tyler Businesses During COVID-19.” Hopefully, politics will take more of a back seat with me in the near future.

 

 

 

“When Japan Defeated Mongols,” by J.D. Meyer—performed by Mongrel Catharsis, 1988.

This song is British style Heavy metal in the tradition of Iron Maiden.

It was in 1274 and again in 1281

when the Mongols sailed to war upon the shores of Japan.

The Mongols had the greatest empire

in covering all the lands

from Russia to Indonesia and Hungary to Korea.

But this time, the Mongols met their match

in stronger swords, sacred winds, and lacquered armor.

 

CHORUS: Onward go the samurai.

Grind the Mongols at the coast.

Defend the sacred islands

For Japan we boast.

 

Smaller boats slashed larger fleets,

And walls of stone met the sea.

Nichiren Buddha said they’d strike.

His mystic words do still some chant:

Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.

I do believe

the Sun Goddess still shines upon her chosen land.

For in peace,

she shines like an Eastern Switzerland.

Repeat Chorus and song title until fade.

 

Footnote: Nam-myoho-renge-kyo = Devotion to the mystic law of cause-and-effect shown in all phenomena. “Nam” is a contraction for “Na-mu” when you chant faster.

Riding Yellow SE from Wal-Mart/Troup to Bergfeld Center during Reduced Schedule, by J.D. Meyer

Due to the Coronavirus crisis, Tyler Transit has temporarily ended the Green & Purple Lines while reducing times for the other three lines: Red, Yellow, and Blue. Update: The Red Line will follow the Purple North pathway after leaving Bergfeld Center; thus, it will go down Beckham AV and the two hospitals.

Since I need to catch the nearest Yellow SE to Bergfeld Center—Tyler Transit’s second bus hub–I need to work out a schedule.  I’m going to list the times for stops at the Yellow SE line.  Meanwhile, I‘ll acknowledge the gap of time when the Yellow line is in the Southwest.

6:00 am — 8:53 am.

11:22 am – 1:00 pm

3:22 pm – 5:45 pm.

https://www.cityoftyler.org/home/showdocument?id=1484   Yellow Line: Complete Map with Schedule & All Stops.

Reduced Yellow SE Line Schedule

6:00 am – 8:53 am

Yellow SW from 6:00 am – 6:52 am

6:52 Wal-Mart/ Troup

6:50 Golden/VA Clinic

7:08 UT-Tyler

7:18 Reach Bergfeld Center

8:14 Leave Bergfeld Center

8:19 Green Acres Shopping Center

8:29 Wal-Mart/Troup

8:37 Golden/VA Clinic

8:43 UT-Tyler

8:53 Reach Bergfeld Center

No Bus Until 11:22, Leave Bergfeld Center

11:22 am – 1:00 pm

11:22 Leave Bergfeld Center

11:27 Green Acres Shopping Center

11:37 Wal-Mart/Troup

11:45 Golden/VA Clinic

11:57 UT-Tyler

12:07 Reach Bergfeld Center (Go SW)

Yellow SW from 12:07 pm—1:00 pm

No Bus from 1:00 pm — 3:22 pm

Yellow SW from 3:22 pm – 4:10 pm.

3:22 pm – 5:45 pm

4:13 Leave Bergfeld Center

4:18 Green Acres Shopping Center

4:28 Wal-Mart/Troup

4:36 Golden/VA Clinic

4:42 UT-Tyler

4:52 Reach Bergfeld Center

Yellow SW from 4:52 pm – 5:45 pm

BIG 4 Clusters of Commonly Confused Words (CCW)

Commonly confused words, or homonyms, are words that sound alike but have different meanings and spellings.  The Big 4 Clusters of CCWs refer to the four sets of the most commonly misspelled homonyms. These word clusters reached this status because they’re such commonly used words. See, I just used one!

But seriously, let’s classify these words according to their function instead of the more typical, “they’re, their, there, etc.” style. Maybe that will make their spelling easier to rememberAssignment: Write twelve sentences using each of these words in its own sentence.

CONTRACTIONS

1. it’s = it is (3rd sing.)

    It’s sunny today.          

 

 

2.  they’re = they are (3rd pl.)

     They’re at the brown brick house.

     Walt and Gloria are at the brown brick house.              

3.  you’re = (2nd  ) you are

    You’re a good cook. You’re good cooks.

 

  • Note that all three of these contractions use “is” or “are” with a subject pronoun.
  • I have used two sentences on #2 to show how a pronoun (they) substitutes for third-person subject nouns.
  • “You’re” is the same word for singular and plural, just as “you” refers to one or more people and can be the subject or object of the sentence.
  •  “You all/y’all” in the South and “You guys” in the North appear to be slang efforts to deal with the lack of two separate words for the second person singular and plural.

POSSESSIVE

4.  its (3rd sing.)

     The house needs its sink fixed.  

It is rare for something without a gender to have or own something.

 

5.  their (3rd pl.)

      Their house is near the park.

      Ray and Dorothy’s house is near the park.

6. your (2nd)

 I like your

   website(s).

 

 

 

      • Notice that none of these possessive pronouns use apostrophes—unlike a noun(s) functioning as a possessive adjective would require an apostrophe. For example: “Danny’s screwdriver” could be referred to as “his screwdriver” if somebody else was talking about it.
      • The odd reality about #4 “its” is noted in the box.
      • I have used two sentences in #5 to show how a pronoun (their) functioning-as-an-adjective substitutes for third person possessive nouns, which in this case serves as the subject of the sentence.
      • “Your” is the same word for singular and plural.  

ONE SPELLING, TWO MEANINGS 

  homonym Definition/description Example
7. to preposition before a noun or pronoun meaning “towards” She went to the cafeteria.
8. to When used before a verb; the word becomes an infinitive and can’t function as the main verb of the sentence. I love to sing with Spanish tapes while reading lyrics to improve my listening comprehension and have fun doing it.
9. too also (“tambien” in Spanish) I want some chips and hot sauce too.
10. too Over-doing or under-doing of what is desirable. (“demasiado” in Spanish). We put too much salt in that casserole. Is he considered too small to play linebacker in college?

 

ETC.

I don’t have a category for all of these words; here are the two left over from our Big 4 Commonly Confused Sets of Words.

 

11.  there = refers to direction or location.

      There is a red truck coming down the street.                                                   

12. two = 2.

I kept two kittens from the first litter.             

 

 

                        MOST CONFUSING OF THE BIG 4 CCW’S

“It’s” and “its” receive my vote for the most frequently confused pair or set of words in this category; this seems to be a unanimous decision. Even books and website entries may show this error, a lack of editing.

Furthermore, animals that you don’t know are referred to by “its” For example, “The jaguar hurt its paw.”

On the other hand, you should refer to animals that you know personally by their gender—not “it” or “its.” Obviously this applies to house pets, a favorite farm animal, and even more creatures if you’re a zoo employee or in a related profession. For example, “Fluffy is friendly to all visitors. Also, when she lived with a previous owner, Fluffy used to visit a neighborhood-gathering spot frequently and gained much respect for her rat-catching ability.”

 

http://www.edhelper.com/language/language_samples113.html  EdHelper provides “List of Homonyms” 252 groups of words. You’ll need to provide the meaning for the words.