About Dexamethasone, a steroid, for the Treatment of COVID-19

https://www.covid19treatmentguidelines.nih.gov/…/corticost…/

KEY QUOTE from ARTICLE…….. “Panel recommends against using dexamethasone for the treatment of COVID-19 in patients who don’t require supplemental oxygen (AI). If dexamethasone isn’t available, the Panel recommends using alternative glucocorticoids such as prednisone, methylprednisolone, or hydrocortisone.”…….

EXPERIMENT “I have #COPD & #asthma. I take #prednisone & Advair among many other medicines. Do you think those two drugs would help me from having a severe attack of #coronavirus if I caught it? I use #oxygen after a long walk.”

P.S. This suggestion has some implications. Could I miss the endangered list for bad lung patients? I’m not automatically suggesting that dexamethasone/prednisone plus oxygen necessarily be the treatment in a hospital. Furthermore, other daily medications could boost the immune system and be a confounding variable, and they may work on heart/blood pressure and or fat/obesity problems. Magnesium and CoQ10 are are great!

By the way, I tested negative at the Tyler Care Clinic Quick COVID-19 test on Friday, August 28. Previously, I tested negative at St. Louis Baptist Church on Wednesday, June 17.

Review results from studies evaluating corticosteroids for the treatment of COVID-19.

 

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Stew with Meals-on-Wheels & my Kitchen Goodies.

I made a stew today with ingredients from my daily Meals-on-Wheels meals and my favorite kitchen goodies. I decided to make a stew starting with a rectangular meat patty, hot dog, chopped potatoes, red beans, and green peas–all from Meals-on-Wheels. All of these goodies went into a pot on the stove after I’d sizzled the chopped hot dog with onions & vegetable oil.

Then I added some favorites from my ‘frig: onions, minced garlic, nopalitos (cactus slices), kale, beer, & purple cabbage. The included spices were Italian Mix (oregano and more), Mrs. Dash Southwest, ground cumin, and Mrs. Renfro salsa (spicy tomato). Then I boiled some beef ramen, and I added most of that pot to the mix. The next day, I microwaved a hot link to add to the mix. I hope my recipe helps you from having food waste issues!

My Juneteenth/Dreamer story.

My Juneteenth/Dreamer story. My grandpa, Joe Leo Meyer (1874-1944), was a refugee from Alsace, France. He fled to Victoria, TX when he was only 16, and moved in with his uncle. Joe learned English when he got here; he spoke Alsatian, a language more like German than French. Eventually, Grandpa started the Dr. Pepper plant of Palestine, TX. Juneteenth was his biggest business day of the year. He helped his star employee (a Black guy) learn German. Grandpa used to tell my Dad, “C’mon Bobo, I gotta take Nolan to Willie-the-Butcher, so he can practice his German.”
I heard Nolan ended up getting a doctorate. Later in life, I did the research. Dr. Nolan Hamilton Anderson, MD got his degrees from Wiley College, University of Michigan, and Meharry University. Dr. Anderson returned home to Wiley, the HBCU of Marshall, TX, and taught there; he practiced medicine too He was honored by the NAACP and delivered future boxer, George Foreman. Nolan was one of the Great Debaters as a Wiley College student too! Wiley College defeated USC (University of Southern California) in 1935. http://artofthepossibleonline.blogspot.com/2008/08/capturing-real-great-debaters.html

MLK Presentation in Tyler 2013: Fred McClure, Keynote Speaker, Reported by J.D. Meyer

MLK Presentation in Tyler 2013: Fred McClure, Keynote Speaker,
Reported by J.D. Meyer

Tyler celebrated the 27th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Interfaith Community Program at the Immaculate Conception Catholic cathedral. The event is sponsored by the Tyler Together Race Relations Forum (TTRRF). The invocation by Max Lafser of Tyler Unity included a Bible verse that indicated where we’ve been in the past doesn’t necessarily have a bearing on the future. The local unit of the Korean War veterans presented the colors. The whole audience sang “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” and the lyrics were provided in the program. Father Anthony McLaughlin did the welcome. He noted that racism is an inherent evil–meaning it’s everywhere–and the Catholic Church is determined to work against racism. Mayor Barbara Bass was the next speaker, and she shared her reflections on Dr. King. Mayor Bass observed that Dr. King “lived his faith every day.” God called MLK for a special purpose even if it meant risking his life. The movement has grown beyond the borders of the US. The mayor concluded by asking us to grow each day as a community.

Jeff Williams of Exclusivity Marketing delivered the “Occasion for Gathering.” First, Mr. Williams thanked the crowd for coming to the event because MLK Day is a holiday, and we could have gone anywhere or stayed home. He noted that we live in a time of more division than unity. There can be resistance to changing the status quo whether it was the Civil War, women’s vote, or the Civil Rights Movement. You can see further when you’re higher in the elevator. Mr. Williams reflected that Lyndon B. Johnson knew how to get things done. When LBJ met MLK, Blacks were routinely denied the right to vote but paid taxes and died in war. MLK told LBJ, “There’s always the right time to do the right thing.” LBJ asked Dr. King to help him put enough pressure to do the right thing. Mr. Williams reminded us that both Johnson and King were southerners. Johnson was from Texas, and King was from Georgia. As a member of Tyler Together, Mr. Williams wants to know your perspective, what matters to you, and to meet you, so TTRRF can help build a better community. He proclaimed that we can’t afford to lose brain power in the community.

Steve Russell of Empowering Texas Youth introduced the keynote speaker, Fred McClure. They have been friends since high school through belonging to Future Farmers of America (FFA) in neighboring cities. Fred McClure graduated from Nacogdoches High School where he also played football and was a pianist for the band. Mr. McClure earned a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M in 1976 where he became that university’s first African-American student body president. I should add that Texas A&M had fewer than 5% Black enrollment in that era. On the other hand, agricultural economics was Texas A&M’s most popular major back then. After getting a law degree from Baylor, McClure became an advisor to President Ronald Reagan, President George H.W. Bush, and Texas Senator John Tower. Mr. McClure became a member of the Texas A&M Board of Regents in 1995 and later joined the board of directors for the 12th Man Foundation. Now Mr. McClure is the director of the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library Foundation at Texas A&M http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu/.

Sequel to “The Trooper,” by Iron Maiden By J.D. Meyer

As she tromped through the field, a battlefield, where the lifeless and wounded warriors lay, the now-famous nurse—Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) —tried to help the living while other personnel carried away the dead. The time is the 1850’s; the war is the Russian-British Crimean War (1853-1856); the battle is the Battle of Balaclava in 1854. Alas, The Trooper himself was one of the slain. Ms. Nightingale burst into tears when she saw this soldier dead on the ground, for she heard of his legendary bravery from previous battles.
The Russian musket fire killed our Trooper and even his beloved horse. A couple of bugles lay on the ground amidst the fallen soldiers—no longer to summon the troops to battle. Florence Nightingale and the other nurses had to hurdle the lifeless bodies to reach the wounded—although often mortally wounded. Nurse Nightingale told another nurse, “Such carnage! I’m ready for peace, so we can return to dealing with colds and sprained ankles.” The other nurse agreed, ”Our calling is tough. But it’s really becoming modern science.”
The last round of fire in The Battle of Balaclava got The Trooper; he feared the end was near during this bloody battle. At first, it looked like either side could have claimed a pyrrhic victory. But the British blundered with a final cavalry charge, immortalized in Tennyson’s, “Charge of the Light Brigade,” that wiped out many British cavalry. Ottoman Turk losses were heavy too.
A few Turkish allies lay near The Trooper—some clinging to life. One Turk told Nurse Nightingale about The Trooper’s bravery. “The Trooper seemed like a man possessed. He kept charging toward the Russian lines, dodging many a bullet until the last one felled his horse, then him. We didn’t think he’d last as long as he did.” Nurse Nightingale wept.
No country had more to lose in the Crimean War than the Ottoman Empire—now known as modern Turkey, a smaller but stronger country. Long known as “The Sick Man of Europe,” the Ottoman Empire’s decline was well under way. World War I, some 60 years late, finished the Ottoman Empire’s demise—only to be reborn as the first secular Moslem country in history—Turkey—through the leadership of Attaturk in the 1920’s. Unfortunately, Turkey has experienced “democratic backsliding” under President Tayyip Erdogan in recent years.

Now we have Indonesia as the second predominantly Moslem secular country. It has a constitution that protects non-Moslems, and it’s even had the Confucian Church of Indonesia since the late 19th century through the efforts of Chinese immigrants. Indonesia is also the home of the Jaringan Islam Liberal, directed by Ulil Abshar-Abdallah.
Thanks to the noble Turk soldier and the Battle of Balaclava and Nurse Florence Nightingale, The Trooper is not forgotten and never was alone. Nurse Nightingale even sent a message by telegraph about the tale of The Trooper to her hospital administrator back home in England—just in case she didn’t make it back, but she did.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMyMS-p9YW0 “The Trooper,” by Iron Maiden (with lyrics).

How To Make Sense of the Pandemic as a Ruist (Confucianist) ?

Confucius Academy

Hallo, my name is Bin Song. I am a Ru scholar, therapist, and college professor in the disciplines of philosophy, religion, and theology. This audio is written and recorded by me to help make sense of the cause of this pandemic in light of the spiritual practice of Ru meditation.

Before you start to listen to my words, I recommend you to do a short breathing practice to calm our heart and illuminate our mind. So, please position yourself well, sit, incline, or simply lie down. Using your belly muscles, be aware of the minor movements of your body, and then, focus upon your breath. Breathe in, deeply, slowly, and comfortably. Breathe out, feel the release, and feel the relax. And a short pause. Again, breathe in, breathe out. remember, no matter how bad the pandemic is, how frustrated you feel about your situation, there is always air and oxygen…

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My Illnesses & Pills: Strengthening the Immune System–One Way to Battle the COVID-19/Coronavirus Pandemic, by J. D. Meyer (2nd Edition)

Dang, I’ve been feeling good for four years! But I fit the stereotype of someone that ought to be “fixin’ to get sick”—lungs illness, namely COPD (since 2005) and asthma (since 1986). I got on the combination of SSDI, Medicare, and Medicaid by 2012. I’m writing this article about my illnesses and pills because medical professionals may find clues to finding a way to battle the COVID-19/coronavirus pandemic. Dealing with the pandemic takes three routes in the medical community: building the immune system, finding antibodies, and discovering a vaccination. My article represents the way for educated laymen to contribute.

I take at least 15 pills per day (11 different pills)—a motley mix of prescription drugs, vitamins/minerals, and OTC drugs. I have more health issues than Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome (ACOS). Quitting cigarettes was important as was quitting snuff tobacco. Nowadays, I occasionally indulge with Smoky Mountain Herbal Snuff (Wintergreen Flavor). It’s made from corn husks and molasses; it’s made in Sandy Hook, CT.

Here are the rest of my diagnoses: Mixed hyperlipidemia E 78.2, Essential (primary) hypertension I10, atherosclerosis heart disease of native coronary artery without angina pectoris I25.10, and macular degeneration. Furthermore, I get monthly allergy shots for Bermuda and Johnson grass, and I have sleep apnea.

Now let’s check out my daily pills. Prescriptions: Daliresp, Montelukast, Dilacor (DILT), Omega 3 Acid Ethyl Esters (4, Take two twice daily), and Prednisone. Vitamins/Minerals: Magnesium, CoQ10, Vitamin D (2), Ocuvite (Vision Health). That last pill is a mix of Vitamins A, C, E and Zinc, Selenium, Copper, and Lutein. Over the Counter Medicine (OTC): Vitamin B-Complex with C (general health)& Loratadine (non-drowsy generic pill for allergies).

Here are the drugs that I inhale. Obviously, I have a rescue inhaler, and it’s Combivent (albuterol + ipratropium). I graduated from the albuterol inhalers a while back. But my nebulizer fluid is albuterol only. Then I take Advair twice daily, an anti-inflammatory.

Here are the occasional OTC drugs and vitamins/minerals: Sudafed (nasal congestion), Mucinex–aka. Guaifenesin (chest congestion/bronchitis). , Milk Thistle (liver health) and rarest of all—Turmeric Curcumin (anti-inflammation). Before I got health insurance, Mucinex and Sudafed were very frequent companions. I’ve become a member of the Chris Cuomo Fan Club and explained the joy of Mucinex on his website.

Let’s hope that my list of medicines and illnesses helps medical researchers during our pandemic crisis. I was invited to join the local Community Health Workers (CHW) coalition several years ago because of my explanation of lung health issues for the layman. I used to be a teacher–mostly Developmental English/Writing (college level), ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages)for all levels, and all-level/ most subjects substitute teacher.

Some of those drugs and whatnot represent a journey! Magnesium is a new friend. First I was put on statins and developed heart issues. Then I found CoQ10 and that helped. Then I had a phase of Red Yeast Rice–a more organic, mellow statin. Then I read a couple of journal articles against it and stumbled onto Magnesium. Magnesium is the super mineral. It’s good for excess fat, arthritis, COPD, and even more issues!

My most recent drug is prednisone—previously som’n just for acute attacks. I passed a recent chest X-ray, but my pulmonologist felt that I needed prednisone. After all, I’ve had a low moderate Forced Exhale Volume (FEV) for years. I may be 6’2” and 61 years old, but my FEV is comparable to a short elderly lady’s lungs, or just one lung, or a very short child’s lungs. Stop smoking, stay indoors, or wear a mask/bandanna when shopping.

COVID-19/Coronavirus Annotated Link Page, by J.D. Meyer (2nd Edition)

1. Q & A on Coronavirus (COVID-19) by WHO (World Health Organization). Answers to 23 questions, two information links, subscribe to WHO newsletter. https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses?fbclid=IwAR0cSHcLD8YtFmTG8sq-w8E3p4BVui6L41CieOoR0C1fu_9fbROHjcUcaHQ

2. Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service. By Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Updates began on March 17, 2020. Click for Questions under Review. Top 3 Most Viewed: COVID-19 Signs & Symptoms Tracker, Assessing dyspnea, Global Covid-19 Case Fatality Rates, TRIP database COVID-19 updates. https://www.cebm.net/oxford-covid-19/

3. How the Novel Coronavirus and the Flu are Alike…and Different
Symptoms, Transmission, Degree of Mild vs. Severe Cases, Length of Hospitalization, What % of the Population Will Get Each Virus, Death Rate, Treatment, Vaccines, Impact of Seasonal Weather. https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/03/20/815408287/how-the-novel-coronavirus-and-the-flu-are-alike-and-different?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&fbclid=IwAR0-_S-NHB2OHGoJs6EHu-OBPDp8Qh6xYB6BPxB11ePdN_519YgFeIheNCE

4. Why ‘Death Rates’ from Coronavirus Can Be Deceiving. “The answer involves how many people are tested, the age of an infected population and factors such as whether the health care system is overwhelmed, scientists say.”
https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2020/03/27/821958435/why-death-rates-from-coronavirus-can-be-deceiving?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&fbclid=IwAR1P6Dzb5ug-mG-CAY3rfsrl2dJ1c-1YPu2KitdIXl9e4ruNHVP858JqAfE

5. Can a Supplement Protect Me Against the New Coronavirus? “Doctors say there’s limited evidence on how any supplements may or may not affect coronavirus spread and the resulting disease. Here’s what we know right now.” The following supplements are analyzed: elderberry, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, apple cider vinegar, turmeric. https://www.everydayhealth.com/infectious-diseases/can-a-supplement-protect-me-against-the-new-coronavirus/

6. Faces of Coronavirus: One Woman’s Road to Recovery. “…the first signs that she had the disease caused by the novel coronavirus were some aches and a dry cough. Her symptoms quickly escalated to difficulty breathing and fever.” This interview was reviewed by an M.D. https://www.everydayhealth.com/coronavirus/faces-of-coronavirus-one-womans-road-to-recovery/

7. Loss of smell and taste could be the strongest symptom of Coronavirus, experts believe. Loss of smell and taste are stronger predictors than fever and cough—triple other symptoms. The Covid Symptom Tracker App has created a model that also lists new continuous cough, fever, fatigue, diarrhea, abdominal pain and loss of appetite. https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/uk-news/loss-smell-taste-could-strongest-18019703

8. COVID-19, Asthma, Allergies: You’ve Got Questions….(Video with Transcript). “Allergy & Asthma Network compiled a list of questions regarding COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) that people asked during our “Distinguishing the Difference: COVID-19 vs. Allergies vs. Flu” webinar on March 17. The webinar was hosted by Allergy & Asthma Network President and CEO Tonya Winders and board-certified allergist and immunologist Purvi Parikh, MD.” https://www.allergyasthmanetwork.org/covid-asthma-and-allergies-frequently-asked-questions/ General Questions (25), Asthma Management Questions (13), School Questions (3).

9. COVID-19 COMPARISON: Coronavirus vs. Cold vs. Flu vs. Allergies (Chart comparing 12 symptoms among 4 Illnesses) https://coronavirus.health.ok.gov/sites/g/files/gmc786/f/fb-covid-comparison-8.5×11-eng.jpg

10. Coronavirus is not the flu. It’s worse. This 6 ½ minute YouTube video is from the CDC (Center for Disease Control). Twice as contagious , longer incubation period, no shot or immunity, 25% hospitalized > 2%. At least 10 times the fatality rate. Older and compromised people are more vulnerable. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVIGhz3uwuQ&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2oMqPwP76ZMdL_U8GTRjXy4LNaONjc-c_6oHaZ9XnkKOJykpZDo8UnOH4

What Do You Tell People Who Are Scared About the Coronavirus/COVID19 Outbreak? By J.D. Meyer

I will be encouraging. We have many medical professionals working on the Coronavirus/COVID19 crisis throughout the nation and world. The two most visible national officials rising to the occasion are Governor Andrew Cuomo (D-NY), and immunologist, Dr. Anthony Fauci (Director of the National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases). In his inspiring Saturday morning address, Gov. Cuomo asserted, “We are all first responders.” We could help or inspire somebody, but we could also get somebody sick or depressed.

For me, sharing health information on Twitter, Facebook, and Word Press would be my main way to inform and inspire. I taught for 20 years—mostly Developmental English/Writing (a college course), English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) to all ages, and an “All Grades/Most Subjects” substitute teacher. I just hit the 39K tweet mark—starting in October 2011.

Several years ago, I was invited to join the local Community Health Workers (CHW) group—the Northeast Texas CHW Coalition, for I’d written some articles about my health issues for the layman. I’ve been on SSDI for COPD for a decade! I have a special interest in magnesium since it has really helped improve my health for the past two years—cholesterol, arthritis, and COPD. CoQ10 was another relatively recent find for me, and it helps heart health.

Furthermore, I can share academic or entertaining information on a broader scale. After all, plenty of students are going to be studying online. Maybe I could publicize my love of Tejano music improving my Spanish to friends’ kids? The other day, I brought a spare Brookshire’s cooking magazine and a brief bio-sketch on Sriracha Hot Sauce by Huy Fong foods to a young mom and her depressed 2nd-grade daughter, who was stuck with her in the kitchen of a nearby service station.

I’m continuing to offer relevant follow-up articles of mine to the Tyler First 2020 Open House leaders. It was a great event just before the Coronavirus shutdown at the Rose Garden city’s convention building with plenty of posters, handouts, and websites. Urban studies have been a hobby of mine for many years—even longer than health.

As for being entertaining, I asked Facebook associates if they would like to share information on interior decorating accomplishments during the shutdown. Besides lots of counter and table dusting and paper sorting and trashing, I rearranged some decorative bar stools. I did receive several responses–including some photos from someone who rearranged some heavy tools in his garage!

Wish us luck in being informative, entertaining, and persuasive.  There’s a new Facebook group called, “Support Our Local Tyler Businesses During COVID-19.” Hopefully, politics will take more of a back seat with me in the near future.